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that in washington tonight. do relations with america change? >> it was a surprise to hear jesse jackson praying and then he asked got to build bridges between the states and venezuela. the states are the only ones who pay cash for 3,000 barrels. the others are interchanged with china, russia and places in the caribbean. there's a hate and love relation. whenever it's going to be better then the government says that the yankees cater to chavez and they fire our assistant to chavez here. but i think his successor must be more conciliatory. i think the surprise was jesse jackson and maybe he was surprised that someone asked for better relations with the states. they were helping a lot on establishing relations. >> you mentioned the oil and, of course, america is the biggest importer of venezuelan oil. it has to have good relations with this country but it is looking for an alternative to this system of government. do you think now the opposition in venezuela could have success? >> it would be very difficult. the emotion on chavez, the sentiment and the government controls all the power. there's no
. this kind of assessment -- we need this first before any changes will be done. >> and from angela merkel, more caution. >> just because two countries have changed their minds does not mean 25 others have to follow suit. >> david cameron said lifting the embargo would not necessarily mean britain army rebel groups right now. the french have been a little more forceful, but the issue will now be passed to foreign ministers to decide. the current embargo expires at the end of may. if no compromise is found, britain and france could choose to let the embargo last and then go it alone. that would be controversial, but they have certainly use the second anniversary of the conflict to send a message -- "we are not doing enough." overr more on the debate whether to arm the rebels and what if anything the major powers can do to stop the with georgee spoke w. bush's national security adviser. a year ago, you argue that farming syria's rebels was desperately required. where do you stand now? series rebelsg was desperately required. >> we are late. we should have done more before now. >> will britai
term, this represents a change. the person who will over from nicolas -- from hugo chavez, nicolas maduro, has nothing of chavez's charisma. shaw has managed, with -- chavez managed with a strong, firm hand to hold his followers together. speculation is that maduro will not be able to do that. the country is facing serious problems -- inflation, 30%. this is a country with huge oil reserves, the biggest oil reserves in the world, yet it is having to borrow money from china just to keep its bank balance a float. it is very badly mismanaged economic elite. they think that will give a chance to take on whoever replaces -- economically. they think that will give them a chance to take on whoever replaces chavez. >> when is the actual funeral likely to take place? do we have any idea the moment? >> [laughter] i wish i could tell you that. the vice president has said he will be embalmed so that his body can remain visible for all time, like ho chi minh. that is the plan at the moment. he is going to stay in the military academy for another seven days. then he will be moved to the museum
>> hello. the data, we are told, is going to change everything. the trillions of bits of data that we create as we go about our daily lives are being stored, and increasingly examined. governments, companies, medical researchers, and now the police say that they, too, can exploit its potential gold mine of information. a law-enforcement intelligence people are turning to data to find patterns, clues to help solve crimes. and there are hints that some data may even help to predict crime, too. here is susan watts. >> you might think it is standard practice in crime and intelligence to look for patterns in criminal behavior, but the clearest patterns only emerge when you have masses of data and a good way to analyze it. whether that is policing a tough neighborhood or investigating a vast terror network. >> this is where they sort out useful information from huge volumes of data, making out crimesions from where happen and people and events. disentanglingn complex networks of criminal activity. >> there are some people you can find and osama bin laden is just a way here. >> he se
economy is made up of things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you readjust your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested, and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments. turn here. >> bbc world news was presented by kcet, los angeles. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: house budget chairman paul ryan offered his blueprint for federal spending today, but a white house spokesman dismissed it, saying the math doesn't add up. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the republican proposal, as president obama begins a series of meetings with members of congress to restart a bipartisan dialogue. >> woodruff: then we turn to the conversation sparked by facebook executive sheryl sandberg in her new book about women juggling careers, family, and leadership roles. >> brown: spencer michels reports on a gold mine of inf
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5